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Online TMD Diet Diary Research Project

Online TMD Diet Diary Research Project The TMJ Association received the following request from Professor Justin Durham and his research team at Newcastle University. We encourage TMJ patients to participate in this project as it is an under researched

Drug Induced Bruxism

The authors of this article state that orofacial movement disorders (bruxism) are treated typically by dental professionals and not by those specialists (neurologists) researching and treating the other movement disorders (Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, tremors, etc.). Again, this is more evidence of the complexity of TMD and the need for multidisciplinary research and treatment in TMD.

Cervical Muscle Tenderness in Temporomandibular Disorders and Its Associations with Diagnosis, Disease-Related Outcomes, and Comorbid Pain Conditions

To analyze cervical tenderness scores (CTS) in patients with various temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and in controls and to examine associations of CTS with demographic and clinical parameters.

You, Your Esophagus and TMD

The esophagus is a roughly ten-inch hollow tube that descends from your throat through the diaphragm into the stomach. Normally, it is a one-way street transporting food you swallow to the stomach for digestion. But in GERD— Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease— the flow can reverse so that stomach contents (including gastric acids) are regurgitated upwards to cause a burning sensation (heartburn), nausea, pain and other distressing symptoms.

It's Time to Be Part of the Solution

The National Academy of Medicine (NAM) Study on Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) is well underway. We strongly encourage everyone affected by TMD to write to the NAM committee letting them know what it is like to live with TMD and your experiences with getting care.

Sally's Story

  • May 13, 2015

My TMJ issues have been present for the last ten years. It started as migraine headaches and progressed into neck and shoulder pain. Doctors sent me to physical therapy and treated the headaches with numerous medications. We started narrowing down the pain to the jaw area. One day my physical therapist tried to loosen up my jaw for some stretching and didn't like what she felt. She stopped immediately and told me I should go see an oral surgeon. At first I didn't understand but I was willing to try anything to treat the pain issues I was facing on a daily basis.

Upon visiting the oral surgeon he some x-rays and an MRI and said my condition was too severe for him to treat. He referred to two medical centers. Once he described to the issues I decided to get a second opinion. He told me the bone leading up to the socket in my jaw was cracked, disfigured, and falling apart. The bone had ground up the cartilage, disc, and socket. Without getting surgery soon, I would face not being able to open and close my mouth to talk or eat. I knew that surgery was not something I wanted.

My second opinion turned into seeing nine different doctors all over the state. Every doctor I saw told me the same thing. You need surgery soon and I can't do it. Finally I contact the two medical centers and set up a consultation. I also found patients that had the surgery and the type of device that both places recommended. I did my own interview process and decided on a hospital and the TMJ Concepts device. After waiting seven months I had surgery to replace my left joint, socket and mandible on Jan 24th, 2011.

The surgery went very well. Once home the only issues I faced was controlling the pain and swelling. I am currently in week six of my healing and with every week the pain is reducing. The swelling is coming down at a very slow pace. I can talk, chew, and eat soft foods. I only experience a little of the former pain I used to have and the doctor told me that should decrease with time. I'm so grateful for how I was treated and the good out come I have had to far. I would recommend to anyone that has to have this surgery to consider the device I had put in since it's customized to your specific skull. Once I was in surgery they removed the degenerative pieces of my jaw, overlaid the new pieces and attached it to my bone. I feel this process has helped with my recovery process.

As far as how long my device will last, we will see. I hope to take good care of the joint and have it last longer than the average time we are currently seeing in other patients.

Sally

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In Treating TMJ

To view or order a free booklet about TMJ Disorders, visit the National Institutes of Health website.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES
National Institutes of Health
National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research
Office of Research on Women's Health