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Statement by NIDCR Acting Director on the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Report on Temporomandibular Joint Disorders

I am pleased to announce the release of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) report, Temporomandibular Disorders: Priorities for Research and Care. As underscored by the comprehensive report, temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJDs) are a diverse and still poorly understood set of complex, painful conditions affecting the jaw muscles and tissues, temporomandibular joints, and associated nerves. Clearly, there is much more to be understood, and these conditions continue to confound medical and dental health care providers and researchers.

New Report on Temporomandibular Disorders: Priorities for Research and Care

With support from the Office of the Director of the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine appointed a committee to address the current state of knowledge regarding TMD research, education and training, safety and efficacy of clinical treatments, and associated burden and costs.

Have you seen the film Dark Waters?

The Film. Dark Waters is about attorney Robert Billott's real-life 20 year legal battle against DuPont chemical for releasing toxic waste - perfluorooctanoic acid, or PFOA - into Parkersburg, West Virginia's water supply, with devastating health effects on the townspeople and livestock. PFOA, also known as C8, is a man-made chemical. It is used in the process of making Teflon and similar chemicals known as fluorotelomers.

Online TMD Diet Diary Research Project

Online TMD Diet Diary Research Project The TMJ Association received the following request from Professor Justin Durham and his research team at Newcastle University. We encourage TMJ patients to participate in this project as it is an under researched

Drug Induced Bruxism

The authors of this article state that orofacial movement disorders (bruxism) are treated typically by dental professionals and not by those specialists (neurologists) researching and treating the other movement disorders (Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, tremors, etc.). Again, this is more evidence of the complexity of TMD and the need for multidisciplinary research and treatment in TMD.

Diane

  • Dec 29, 2015

I am 53 years old and have had five jaw surgeries. In the first surgery my lower jaw was lengthened. The second surgery bone spurs were removed and the discs were pulled back into place. For the third surgery in 1994, I had artificial joints by TMJ Implants, Inc. The fourth surgery was in August 2012 to remove the worn out joints and insert spacers.  The surgery was very lengthy--over 8 hours. Scar tissue that had formed was removed. One side was out of the hinge and the other side had screws floating in scar tissue. My jaw was wired shut for the first night; images were obtained and sent to the implant manufacturer. After the surgery I had swelling, pain, and facial paralysis. I had minimal movement of my upper lip, nose, and eyebrows. My fifth surgery was in October 2012 for which I received custom joints by TMJ Concepts.  Even though some modifications were necessary to make one of the joints fit, the surgery went very well and I had very little swelling. After a pain protocol was established, I was able to control the pain and chew soft foods.

Now I am three years post op, and I still have side effects from the surgeries. My eyebrows still do not move. I have some swelling in my cheeks and numbness on the right side. In January of 2016 I will have an eyebrow lift. I am also experiencing a hooding effect, which affects my vision. This picture was taken in August of 2015. I'm progressing, but not as quickly as I would like.